Fragrance Allergens Found in Beauty Products

When we think about reducing air pollution most people think of billowing smoke stacks, but rarely do we think of air pollutants being apart of our morning routine. Cue: your morning perfume.

allergens-in-perfume

An important report was released on this very topic: Secret Scents: How Hidden Fragrance Allergens Harm Public Health by the team at Women’s Voices for the Earth. The report sheds light on how perfume and fragrances are a hidden sources of pollution and are threatening the health of many people like my mom.

Tens of millions of people are affected by fragrance allergies, but have no way of avoiding the ingredients that trigger those allergy attacks, because companies can keep fragrance ingredients secret under federal laws.

What are fragrance allergies?

The authors of the report at Women’s Voices for the Earth, describe allergies and sensitization when physical symptoms including rashes, breathing problems, blisters and headaches after being exposed to a fragrance allergen. It’s important to note that many other health problems can be linked to fragrances, especially for those with multiple chemical sensitivities or when we’re exposed to the toxic chemicals used to make those fragrances.

The problem for those who are allergic to fragrance are increasingly exposed to more of them in lotions, shampoo, air freshners etc., but there is little information to identify what is triggering the allergy.

As the report says:

A fragrance can be made up of hundreds of different chemicals. Imagine having a food allergy and being told nothing more specific than, ‘you are allergic to food.’

For more information on toxic chemicals found in products, check out Safer Chemicals, Healthy Families.

Common fragrance allergens used in cosmetic products:

  • Geraniol: rose scent
  • Eugenol: spicy, clove-like aroma
  • Hydrocitronellol: floral aroma, suggestive of Lily of the Valley
  • A-amylcinnamal: jasmine-like scent
  • Cinnamal: floral scent
  • Isoeugenol: spicy, clove-like aroma

For common allergens used in cleaning products, check out the report here.

Takeaways from Secret Scents include:

  • The European double standard: In the E.U., manufacturers of household products are required to disclose the presence of 26 common fragrance allergens. Many of these companies make the same products in the U.S., but don’t disclose allergens because it’s not required by U.S. law.
  • Doctors in the dark: Dermatologists face an uphill battle in identifying what is causing a patient’s reactions because companies don’t disclose fragrance ingredients, making it difficult for the patient to avoid the allergen in question.
  • The moisturizing paradox: Moisturizing lotion is commonly recommended to prevent flare-ups, but 83% of over-the-counter moisturizers contain fragrance.
  • Fragrance allergies are pervasive: A whopping 20% of the U.S. population is sensitized to an allergen, fragrance being one of the most frequently identified as causing allergic reactions.
  • Our children are paying the price: Studies are showing that children are more impacted by fragrance allergies. Check out my blog on a new line of perfume for babies by Dolce & Gabbana.
  • Women are impacted by fragrance allergies more than men: Because women are exposed to more perfumed personal care products and cleaners, we’re two to three times more likely to suffer from fragrance allergies than men. In addition, women dominated fields like cosmetology, household workers and stylist are frequently exposed to fragrance allergens.
  • Fragrance is hard to avoid: For example, fragrance is found in 96% of shampoos, 91% of antiperspirants, and 95% of shaving products.

How to protect yourself 

For starters, we need better laws that require companies need to disclose fragrance ingredients (including allergens) to allow consumers to make healthy, smart decisions.

1 – You can text the word “BETTERBEAUTY” to 52886 to ask Congress for better beauty laws.

2 – Avoid wearing perfume or cologne, kindly ask your friends to abstain from wearing fragrances

3 – Choose safer beauty products, including those formulated with out synthetic ingredients. My favorite recommendations HERE.

So while we wait for fragrances to label and get rid of nasty toxic chemicals, skip the perfume, scented lotion, air “freshners” and call your Senators and ask major retailers to get serious about moving the market towards safer products.

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16 Responses to Fragrance Allergens Found in Beauty Products

  1. Ann Girsch September 18, 2013 at 4:19 pm #

    Great piece. The public needs to be made aware of this!
    Also, the perils of fragranced laundry detergents and fabric softeners.
    As someone with chemically-induced asthma, I have to avoid passing laundromats, given the toxic air billowing out.
    Lastly, fragranced hand sanitizers are another huge offender. Parents ought to think twice before instructing kids to slather it on.

    • Lindsay Dahl September 18, 2013 at 4:52 pm #

      Ann, it’s true, fabric softeners have become increasingly full of chemicals and fragrance. Thanks for your input!

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